Author - navada

WATCH: How All Video Games Are Made Of Tiny Triangles

Games today are meticulously detailed. They’re mysterious and heartwarming, and colorful and stylized. And that makes them a technical challenge. Though computing power has skyrocketed, gamemakers keep competing to add more detail to their games, pushing the limits of what even the newest technology can compute. Game technology needs to constantly keep up with gamemakers’ creative ambitions.

WATCH: How Disney Will Alter The Future Of Streaming Services

By late 2019, Disney has promised to launch its own online streaming service, further complicating the options for viewers who just want to watch their favorite films and TV online. The competition between streaming services has been great for consumers, so far. Outlets like Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime Video, Shudder, and Filmstruck have been ramping up content and giving us a lot for very little money, but they have the power to take it away too (password lockdowns, pull content). As corporate consolidation heats up, that deal may get a lot worse -- and fast.

WATCH: How These All-White Paintings Sold For Millions

So-called "white paintings" are in museums all across the world and Robert Ryman's all-white painting "Bridge" sold for a record $20.6 million at a Christie's auction in 2015. How are these seemingly plain white paintings considered art and why is it that not anyone can pick up a tube of white paint and make one?

WATCH: Why Some Asian Languages Swap Ls And Rs In English

A foreign accent is when someone speaks a second language with the rules of their first language, and one of the most persistent and well-studied foreign-accent features is a lack of L/R contrast among native Japanese speakers learning English.

It’s so well-known that American soldiers in World War II reportedly used codewords like “lallapalooza” to distinguish Japanese spies from Chinese allies. But American movies and TV shows have applied this linguistic stereotype to Korean and Chinese characters too, like Kim Jong Il in Team America: World Police, or Chinese restaurant employees singing “fa ra ra ra ra” in A Christmas Story.

WATCH: The Real Secret To Sushi Isn’t Fish

One ingredient has been a staple in sushi for over a thousand years—but it began in southeast Asia as a fish preservation method. Farmers would catch fish in rice paddies during the monsoon season. The caught fish were then pickled by salting the entire fish, packing it with cooked rice and weights, and sealing it in a barrel. This method helped prevent the fish from spoiling and gave the fish umami, the savory flavor. It wasn’t until this preservation method made its way to Japan, during the 8th century, did the rice began to be eaten with the fish.